Wednesday, 14 October 2015

A Collaborative Pop-Up Card

IMAG0027 Continuing the flurry of precious departing colleagues, I put together a pop-up card for Sophie, comprising affectionate momentos from her time at the Museum and drawings contributed by the team as a whole.

Sunday, 11 October 2015

Home Alternative to Screen Printing

IMAG0026 We had a flurry of precious colleagues departing our team for pastures new, a few weeks back.  Laura and I decided to coordinate a team screen-print for our fabric-loving Rachel, overlooking the fact that we couldn't find the screen printing equipment.  Faced with the carefully cut templates of all our colleagues, we bravely sponge-rolled the prints instead.  Thankfully it worked.

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Colouring In

Norway (4) I've discovered a new addiction! I'm prone to browsing the new wave of beautiful colouring books for adults in the book shops. But I can't bring myself to buy one, because I would want to spend the time colouring something I've drawn myself. But I'm not so good at drawing from my imagination. How many times have I noted into my sketchbook the instruction 'doodle more'. So after half an hour flicking the pages of Secret Garden by Johanna Basford, I decided I'd better start some doodling. And colouring my 'doodle' became an absorbing, addictive way to pass my spare moments in Norway. And then, I began to think about this very stylised approach as I gazed over the fjord at Gudvangen. Without my sketchbook to hand, I began to consider how I would 'stylise' the trees and houses and their reflections, and later I sat down to doodle again. Perhaps the picture below will be coloured in eventually too ... Norway (2)

Sunday, 4 October 2015

Oyvind Torseter

Inspired as I was by the curating of the Children's Art Gallery in Bergen, it also allowed me to explore a Norwegian children's illustration.  My favourite discovery was Oyvind Torseter, who works with drawings, collage and 3d papercraft to create his scenes, which are photographed.  Beautiful and inspiring!  And without seeing one of his hand-crafted landscapes in the exhibition, it's hard to imagine how the 'flat' illustrations in the books were once so utterly 3 dimensional.
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